When You Touch My Liberty (Don’t Touch Me There)

Posted by Frankly Francis on November 21, 2010 under In The News, Social Issues/Politics | 5 Comments to Read

There’s much being made about having your privates groped or doing a radiated digital strip tease in order to board an airplane these days.  Emotions are running high on both sides of the issue.

Has it really come to this?

So how did it come to this?

Social and political issues are not typically one-offs.  They are usually part of an intertwined pattern of events and circumstances… actions and reactions.

This is how I sort it:

America has had its hand in foreign countries for a long while now.  Post World War II, American foreign aid in rebuilding decimated nations and economies was certainly noteworthy.  America was viewed pretty well throughout the world.

It went to our heads.

We decided that we knew better.

We felt a deep obligation to mold the world in our own image.

America began meddling in affairs of other countries using money to get its way, commencing military affairs and even using black ops assassination teams.  We began an all out effort to deploy our military everywhere.  We propped up tyrants at the expense of their citizens.  We became involved in combat operations all over the place.  America made a pre-emptive strike against Iraq.  From there we began openly utilizing methods of interrogation that involve torture.

Some people do not like being subjected to the atrocities committed by their puppet government held in place by the Americans.  Some people resent the fact that American military actions result in the deaths of their innocent loved ones.  Some religious folks truly believe that American presence on their soil is sacrilegious to their beliefs.

Some of all of these types of people had their lives so shattered by American actions in their lands that they vowed to make America hurt.  Terrorism resulted.

That’s the way it works – you get in somebody’s face, they get back in yours.  Guaranteed blowback.

For the record, I strongly condemn the initiation of violence.

Well as it turns out, we still have this wonderful, if not completely forgotten and misused document known as the constitution which very clearly states that the federal government is responsible to the people for the defense of America – note the word “defense.”  It also clearly states that Americans cannot be subjected to unreasonable search.

We the people need to understand that when we gave up our liberty, the terrorists won.

Now try this on:

Isn’t it ironic that when America is the world’s most powerful country, that we are actually more at risk and more afraid to live on our own soil?  All of our great power and force has only brought violence directly to us.

Here’s Bill Bonner’s take:

We’ve never been mistreated by an agent of the TSA. Bullied, yes. Threatened, yes. They’ve been impolite on occasion. We’ve been patted down so vigorously we didn’t know whether to leave a tip or lodge a complaint.

But we try to maintain a sense of humor.

“The trouble with you, is you just don’t get it,” said a paranoid friend lately. “Can’t you see? This TSA has nothing to do with keeping out bad guys. It’s about keeping us in. They’re not really there to make the airlines safer. Instead, it is just a preparation. They are getting Americans accustomed to following orders, standing in line, and acting like half-wits. They are also training up a whole class of goons. These guys don’t ask whether it really makes sense to pat down girl scouts and look at old ladies naked. They just do whatever they’re told to do. And they probably enjoy it.

“There are always some people like that – ready to be concentration camp guards and exterminators. The TSA program helps the authorities identify these people.”

“Why”” we asked.

“Who knows…maybe they just want power. Maybe they just want a docile population so they can do what they want.”

A few years back we took a family trip to NYC.  We were selected for the enhanced search.  As American citizens with no cause for suspicion, I was humiliated when I saw my nearly 80 year old mother-in-law’s arms out in the “airplane” position.  I understood how the Nazis pulled off the Holocaust.

I get the feeling that a lot of people are under the mistaken impression that submitting to the government mandates is necessary for the privilege of flying.  But Americans never sacrifice their constitutional rights to the government.

As bizarre as it seems today, in truth, it is the government’s obligation to protect our rights – not take them away.

When you board a plane, if you have not given the authorities reasonable grounds to search you, then they cannot legally search you.  It’s that simple.  It really is.  Seriously, it really is.

And I don’t want to hear that tired line, “if you have done nothing wrong, you have nothing to fear.”  The very existence of that line gives one much to fear.

If you believe that the government’s rules and actions are protecting you, I would respectfully ask you to think that through again.

I’ve heard some comments from those in support of cooperating with invasive body inspections that if someone doesn’t want to go through the procedure, that’s OK – they should take another mode of transportation.  I would suggest that if you are willing to give up your liberty by complying with unconstitutional actions then it is you who should find another mode of transportation.

Don’t let them touch your liberty.



P.S. I don’t vouch for the accuracy of the following demonstration of the radiation strip scanners, but on the surface it seems reasonable.  Be forewarned that it is graphic and should not be watched if you are sensitive to reality.


Are We Trying to Reach the Future Through the Past?

Posted by Frankly Francis on November 7, 2010 under Social Issues/Politics | Be the First to Comment

People can certainly be savage, but there is great nobleness within us as well.

People can certainly do stupid things (re: amending the constitution to prohibit alcohol), but we also do some wonderful things.  As Sir Winston Churchill said, “Americans always do the right thing.  After they have tried everything else.”

People can actually want to be controlled by authority and be told what to they can do, but even the densest of us knows that this experience, whatever it may be, should be uniquely our own to live our own way.

And I think that if We the People would stop to think about it, we would take cognitive note of the vast difference between Patriotism and Nationalism.  Seriously.

Time marches on.  In life, the only constant is change.

We have been choosing a growing central authority.  I do not think that this is wise.

Kurt Vonnegut, the curmudgeon that he was notwithstanding, was so alienated that his final book was entitled “A Man Without a Country.”

David Bowie wrote the song “I’m Afraid of Americans.”

I certainly understand where they are coming from.  As an American, I’m afraid of Americans.

I’m afraid that we are giving up still revolutionary freedom and liberty in exchange for centralized government control, which historically, at best, doesn’t work as well.

It is really painfully obvious that if we don’t remember the mistakes we made in the past, we are likely to make them again.

From my point of view, we are reverting to the very systems that caused our forebears to come to America in the first place.  Going full circle, so to speak.

Perhaps we are trying to reach the future through the past.

We are putting out fires with gasoline.  It won’t work.

Instead, we must continue the revolution that we were born into.  It’s still the best one yet in recorded history.

Fight the Power Brothers and Sisters.